Male octopuses biggest problem is being eaten by a female

Male octopuses have a big problem: female octopuses...
Male octopuses biggest problem is being eaten by a female

Each male wants to mate and pass on his genes to a new generation. The trouble is, the female is often larger and hungrier than he is, so there is a constant risk that, instead of mating, the female will strangle him and eat him.

The males have a host of tricks to survive the mating process. Some of them can quite literally mate at arm's length. Others sneak into a female's den disguised as another gal, or sacrifice their entire mating arm to the female and then make a hasty retreat.

It's all very macabre. It's also a paradox. Octopuses are some of the most antisocial, unfriendly animals alive. Yet their bodies have evolved in such a way that they must mate in the most intimate way possible: the male has to insert his sperm directly into the female's body using one of his arms. The resulting mating practices are not just a curiosity: they are a window onto how octopuses have evolved into the creatures they are today.

Read more on BBC Earth

XXX

by Laura Stackhouse

readmt.com Editor

Laura Stackhouse is the Web Editor of readmt.com, an official publication of the International Marine Purchasing Association (IMPA). To discuss news, features or contributing to readmt.com please get in touch.

Tracker Pixel for Entry